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COVID-19 Resource Guide: COVID-19 Vaccine Information

This guide is for advocates (direct and indirect) looking for resources during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Vaccine Guide Understanding

There are currently three COVID-19 vaccines available within the United States. There has been a roll out since January 2021 on who would have access to these vaccines. Starting April 5th, 2021, all individuals who are 16 years or older should have the ability to access these vaccines. The choice to get vaccinated is a personal one, though. Having as much information as possible is part of the decision-making process. As advocates, we also must understand why members of our communities may not choose to get the vaccine or feel left out gaining access. In order to support this understanding, the following information as been pulled together. This page will provide supportive information on the available vaccines, state and local vaccine access, and resources to understand hesitancy in certain populations. 

Vaccines in the United States

Currently Available Vaccines

Moderna

This vaccine is provided via two doses spaced 28 days apart. There is a 15-30 minute observation period after each dose to check for immediate side effects. The Moderna vaccine is available for those who are 18 and older. This vaccine has been authorized by the FDA and recommended by the CDC as one of three vaccines within the United States. 

CDC Moderna information includes how the vaccine works, who should get the vaccine, and clinical trial demographics.

Pfizer

This vaccine is provided via two doses spaced 21 days apart. There is a 15-30 minute observation period after each dose to check for immediate side effects. The Pfizer vaccine is available to those who are 16 and older. This vaccine has been authorized by the FDA and recommended by the CDC as one of three vaccines available within the United States. 

CDC Pfizer information includes how the vaccine works, who should get the vaccine, and clinical trial demographics.

Johnson & Johnson

This vaccine is provided with only one dose. There is a 15-30 minute observation period after each dose to check for immediate side effect. The Johnson & Johnson vaccine is available to those who are 18 or older. This vaccine has shown to have lower efficacy compared to the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. It has shown to prevent hospitalizations and death in those who do get sick as well as protection against asymptomatic infection. 

CDC Johnson & Johnson information includes how the vaccine works, who should get the vaccine, and clinical trial demographics.

*Use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine has been paused until further noticed across the state.*

MI COVID-19 Vaccine Information

Vaccines in the state of Michigan have availability based on county. Visit the Michigan government site to find out what your county availability is. Starting on April 5th, 2021 eligibility requirements for vaccination in Michigan will be for all individuals who are 16 and older. If you take either the Moderna or Pfizer vaccines, you will receive an automated reminder from Michigan Care Improvement Agency (MCIR) to schedule your second dosage appointment. 

As of March 19th, 2021, 12.8% of the Michigan population has been fully vaccinated. The linked graph shows the trend in vaccination progress within the state. 

VaccineMI is a community driven site that can support decision making for vaccination within one's county. VaccineMI provides information on locations and sign up ability by specific sites. 

Considerations in Access

The following resources are articles to review in consideration of vaccination roll out and how this impacts the decision-making process for individuals in a variety of communities.